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Motoneuron response to dorsal root stimulation in anesthetized monkeys after spinal cord transection

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Summary

In preparation for studying the spinal cord alterations produced by operant conditioning of spinal reflexes, we studied peripheral nerve responses to supramaximal dorsal root stimulation in the lumbosacral cord of deeply anesthetized monkeys before and after thoracic cord transection. Except for variable depression in the first few minutes, reflex responses were not reduced or otherwise significantly affected by transection in the hour immediately following the lesion or for at least 50 h. The results suggest that reduction in muscle spindle sensitivity and/or in polysynaptic motoneuron excitation contributes to stretch reflex depression after cord transection.

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Correspondence to J. R. Wolpaw.

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Wolpaw, J.R., Lee, C.L. Motoneuron response to dorsal root stimulation in anesthetized monkeys after spinal cord transection. Exp Brain Res 68, 428–433 (1987). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00248809

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Key words

  • Spinal cord
  • Spinal reflex
  • Monosynaptic reflex
  • Spinal shock
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Primate