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Undercover policing in Canada: Wanting what is wrong

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Brodeur, J. Undercover policing in Canada: Wanting what is wrong. Crime Law Soc Change 18, 105–136 (1992). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00230627

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Keywords

  • International Relation