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Assessment of nonpoint source pollution in stormwater runoff in Louisville, (Jefferson County) Kentucky, USA

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Abstract

First flush (first 20 min) and composite (first 3 h) samples of stormwater runoff were collected during a 1-year period (1991–1992) from six sites in the Louisville, Kentucky (USA), metropolitan area. Each collection was analyzed for organic and inorganic compounds, pesticides, nutrients, dissolved solids, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, alkalinity, conductivity, hardness, pH, and temperature. The toxicity of the water was determined by bioassay of fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas Rafinesque).

Mortality in the bioassay was most affected by low DO concentrations in the runoff. High concentrations of chlorides, methoxychlor, and endrin were measured at all the sites throughout the course of the study. Season and rainfall amount and frequency were also important factors affecting mortality. Dilution of toxins and nutrients occurred between the first flush runoff and the runoff at the end of storms, sometimes to below U.S. Federal criteria.

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Marsh, J.M. Assessment of nonpoint source pollution in stormwater runoff in Louisville, (Jefferson County) Kentucky, USA. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 25, 446–455 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00214333

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Keywords

  • Oxygen
  • Chloride
  • Toxicity
  • Waste Water
  • Dissolve Oxygen