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Indoor application of anti-cholinesterase agents and the influence of personal protection on uptake

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Abstract

The relationship between plasma-cholinesterase (ChE) measures and the uptake of anti-cholinesterase agents among 125 greenhouse sprayers in connection with normal working conditions were studied. An in-season ChE depression was observed indicating absorption of organophosphate (OP) or carbamate insecticides (p=0.0001). The in-season enzyme depression among sprayers, exclusively exposed to carbamates (p=0.06), probably reflects chronic percutaneous or oral uptake in the intervals between spraying by cultivating pretreated flowers. The frequency of applications (p=0.03) and the wearing of protective clothings (p=0.02) seems to be working habits, which significantly influenced the ChE activities, whereas gloves or face mask did not (p>0.05). Especially, the wearing of whole-body protective clothing (p=0.008) are of particular value in preventing percutaneous absorption.

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Correspondence to Flemming Lander.

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Lander, F., Hinke, K. Indoor application of anti-cholinesterase agents and the influence of personal protection on uptake. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 22, 163–166 (1992). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00213280

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Keywords

  • Enzyme
  • Waste Water
  • Depression
  • Water Management
  • Water Pollution