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Hegel's critique of liberalism and natural law: Reconstructing ethical life

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Abstract

This essay considers the evolution of Hegel's political and legal theory with respect to the emergence of a classical liberal society and modern natural law. I argue that Hegel abandoned his early concerns which focused on a revival of the Greek polis and ethics over legality and refocused his efforts at reaching a modern form of ethical life predicated on the acceptance of classical liberal society and modern natural law. I try to argue that Hegel wanted to achieve a present-day communal ethics without abolishing the modern individual subject endowed with “rights”. However, I seek to draw attention to Hegel's criticism of empirical individualism and social atomism.

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Garza, A. Hegel's critique of liberalism and natural law: Reconstructing ethical life. Law Philos 9, 371–398 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00212704

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Keywords

  • Social Issue
  • Individual Subject
  • Legal Theory
  • Modern Form
  • Liberal Society