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Quantification and correlation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal propagules with soil properties of some mollisols of northern India

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Abstract

The populations of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) propagules by the most probable number method in some mollisols and their correlations with some important soil properties were determined. On average, the six soils, Phoolbagh clay loam, Beni silty clay loam, Haldi loam, Nagla loam, Khamia sandy loam and Patherchatta sandy loam contained 4.9, 4.0, 7.9, 7.9, 3.3 and 13.0 propagules/g soil, respectively, i.e. none of the soils was found to be high in VAM. The size of the VAM population was compared to soil properties such as pH, organic carbon, sand content, available phosphorus and available potassium, cation-exchange capacity, silt and clay contents. A significant positive correlation (r=0.586) was only found with available soil phosphorus (P<0.05) and a significant negative correlation (r=-0.555) with soil clay content (P<0.05).

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Directorate research paper series No. 7862

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Rathore, V.P., Singh, H.P. Quantification and correlation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal propagules with soil properties of some mollisols of northern India. Mycorrhiza 5, 201–203 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00203338

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Key words

  • Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae Population
  • Correlation
  • Soil properties
  • Mollisol