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Modeling intrametropolitan industrial location realistically

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Abstract

This paper compares intrametropolitan industrial location models to the process of intrametropolitan industrial location as described in the real estate and urban economic literature. It identifies seven areas where industrial location models are at odds with reality, and suggests ways to make them realistic. Specifically, it makes a case for microanalytic/stochastic/recursive/dynamic/economic industrial location models. It goes on to describe an operational model that is “realistic” in most respects.

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Ewing, R.H. Modeling intrametropolitan industrial location realistically. Transportation 6, 191–199 (1977). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00203229

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Keywords

  • Operational Model
  • Real Estate
  • Location Model
  • Economic Literature
  • Industrial Location