Journal of Computing in Higher Education

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 15–37

If a picture is worth a thousand words is video worth a million? Differences in affective and cognitive processing of video and text cases

  • Aman Yadav
  • Michael M. Phillips
  • Mary A. Lundeberg
  • Matthew J. Koehler
  • Katherine Hilden
  • Kathryn H. Dirkin
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12528-011-9042-y

Cite this article as:
Yadav, A., Phillips, M.M., Lundeberg, M.A. et al. J Comput High Educ (2011) 23: 15. doi:10.1007/s12528-011-9042-y

Abstract

In this investigation we assessed whether different formats of media (video, text, and video + text) influenced participants’ engagement, cognitive processing and recall of non-fiction cases of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. For each of the cases used in the study, we designed three informationally-equivalent versions: video, text, and video + text. Thirty participants experienced one version in each format, thought aloud as they read or viewed the case, discussed their reactions to the stories during an interview, and completed an affective and engagement survey. Participants were again interviewed 6 weeks later to assess their memory for the cases. Results from protocol analysis indicate that the video and video + text versions of the stories led to higher levels of both engagement and sympathy with the characters, and recall of particular information; however, interactions between medium and content were important. We argue the main benefit of video lies in engaging students emotionally in the content.

Keywords

Cognitive processes/development ANOVA/MANOVA Factor analysis Survey research Learning processes/strategies 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aman Yadav
    • 1
  • Michael M. Phillips
    • 2
  • Mary A. Lundeberg
    • 3
  • Matthew J. Koehler
    • 3
  • Katherine Hilden
    • 4
  • Kathryn H. Dirkin
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Educational StudiesPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.School of Psychological SciencesUniversity of Northern ColoradoGreeleyUSA
  3. 3.Educational Psychology and Educational TechnologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  4. 4.School of Teacher Education & LeadershipRadford UniversityRadfordUSA
  5. 5.Department of Teacher Education & Professional DevelopmentCentral Michigan UniversityMount PleasantUSA