Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear ChemistryAn International Journal Dealing with All Aspects and Applications of Nuclear Chemistry2010285:571

DOI: 10.1007/s10967-010-0571-z

Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, 2005–2009: a citation-based bibliography and impact analysis using Hirsch-type statistics

Tibor Braun1 and András Schubert 
(1)
Editorial Office, Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, Budapest, Hungary
 
 
András Schubert
Received: 7 April 2010Published online: 29 April 2010
© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2010

Abstract

All papers published in the Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry (JRNC) in the period 2005–2009 (source dataset) and all papers citing these papers and published in other journals (target dataset) have been compiled. A scientometric analysis of the datasets has been performed using Hirsch-type statistics. A comprehensive bibliography of the citing papers is presented.

Introduction

In an information leaflet [1] published in 2004, a comprehensive overview has been given on the history of the Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry (JRNC) from its launching in 1968 until the publication year, 2004, as reflected in publication and citation statistics. In the present study, the subsequent five years are analysed in a similar spirit.

Data sources and data processing

Source and citation data have been retrieved from the Web of Science (WoS) database of Thomson–Reuters (Philadelphia, PA, USA). JRNC data have been checked and, if necessary, supplemented and corrected using the Editorial Office files. The WoS “Analyze Results” option was utilized to gain primary statistical surveys; for more detailed or thorough analysis, the necessary bibliographic data have been downloaded, and analyzed by suitable software tools.

Hirsch-type statistics—the h-core

In his groundbreaking paper [2], Hirsch defined what he called the “h-index” (a scientist has index h if h of his/her N papers have at least h citations each, and the other (N–h) papers have fewer than h citations each) to quantify an individual’s scientific output. The apparently innocent paper generated a flood of literature (it was cited more that 500 times until the publication of the present study) ranging from the rudely rejective to the glorifying. Apart from original purpose (evaluation of individuals), it proved to be useful in various other scientometric exercises (see, e.g., [38]), and even far beyond the realms of scientometrics [9, 10].

Among others, the h-index defines a “natural” top class of ranked objects or, at least, a somewhat more self-adjusting one than the usual “top 20s” or “top 1%-s”. The so-called “h-core” includes all items scoring at and above the h-index value. It contains exactly h elements if there is no tie at the h-index value, may contain more if all tied items are included.

In the top lists presented in this paper, the h-core concept is used to cut the lists at their “natural” limits.

Results

In the 5-year period, 2005–2009, JRNC published 2,310 papers. Until the date of the present study (April, 2010), 1,145 of them have been cited at least once. They received 2,923 citations (1.27 citations per item; 2.55 citations per cited item) from 2,095 citing papers. 601 citing papers were published in JRNC itself, 1,494 in 494 other source titles. These two datasets, the 2,310 papers published in JRNC (source dataset) and the 1,494 papers citing them in other journals (target dataset), form the object of the present analysis.

Analysis of countries

Table 1 presents the h-cores of the countries assigned to the papers of the source and the target datasets, respectively, on the basis of the authors’ institutional affiliation indicated in the by-line of the publication. Here and in the following tables core elements occurring in both the source and the target lists are highlighted in italics.

Table 1

The h-core of source and target countries

Source countries

Target countries

Rank

Country

Count

%

Rank

Country

Count

%

1

USA

493

21.34

1

USA

281

18.81

2

Japan

239

10.35

2

Peoples R China

152

10.17

3

Peoples R China

174

7.53

3

Japan

141

9.44

4

Brazil

157

6.80

4

Germany

108

7.23

5

India

148

6.41

5

India

95

6.36

6

Czech Republic

100

4.33

6

Turkey

73

4.89

7

Hungary

77

3.33

7

Italy

71

4.75

8

Germany

73

3.16

8

England

67

4.48

9

Italy

70

3.03

9

Hungary

65

4.35

10

South Korea

68

2.94

10

France

63

4.22

11

Egypt

57

2.47

11

Iran

58

3.88

12

Turkey

57

2.47

12

Brazil

57

3.82

13

Russia

53

2.29

13

Canada

53

3.55

14

Canada

48

2.08

14

South Korea

47

3.15

15

France

48

2.08

15

Spain

45

3.01

16

Portugal

47

2.03

16

Poland

42

2.81

17

Poland

46

1.99

17

Austria

36

2.41

18

England

45

1.95

18

Belgium

36

2.41

19

Mexico

45

1.95

19

Australia

35

2.34

20

Netherlands

43

1.86

20

Russia

34

2.28

21

Pakistan

42

1.82

21

Czech Republic

33

2.21

22

Iran

40

1.73

22

Egypt

29

1.94

23

Austria

39

1.69

23

Romania

28

1.87

24

Belgium

30

1.30

24

Portugal

25

1.67

25

Romania

29

1.26

    

26

Greece

26

1.13

    

As seen, there is a great overlap among the two core lists, and even the distributions are rather similar. USA leads both lists with a share of about 20% followed by the two Asian giants, Japan and China. Asian and Latin American countries are very strongly represented in both lists; as to the EU, the new member states are preeminent.

Analysis of institutions

Table 2 shows the h-cores of the institutions the source and target datasets came from. In the identification of the institutions we completely relied upon the “Analyze Records by Institution Name” option of WoS. We are well aware of the fact that the cleaning of institution names is far from perfect in WoS, particularly, as less developed and non-English speaking countries are concerned. Since, however, we did not want to use this feature for any evaluative purposes, just to have a rough overview on the main sources and targets of JRNC papers, the information provided by WoS seemed to be appropriate.

Table 2

The h-core of source and target institutions

Source institutions

Target institutions

Rank

Institution

Count

%

Rank

Institution

Count

%

1

Bhabha Atom Res Ctr

75

3.25

1

Chinese Acad Sci

52

3.48

2

Los Alamos Natl Lab

70

3.03

2

Hungarian Acad Sci

40

2.68

3

Chinese Acad Sci

66

2.86

3

Bhabha Atom Res Ctr

36

2.41

4

Pacific NW Natl Lab

65

2.81

4

Natl Inst Radiol Sci

30

2.01

5

Univ Sao Paulo

56

2.42

5

Japan Atom Energy Agcy

27

1.81

6

Univ W Bohemia

51

2.21

6

Florida State Univ

26

1.74

7

Hungarian Acad Sci

48

2.08

7

IAEA

21

1.41

8

Korea Atom Energy Res Inst

47

2.03

8

Korea Atom Energy Res Inst

21

1.41

9

Atom Energy Author

43

1.86

9

Atom Energy Author

18

1.20

10

Prague Inst Chem Technol

42

1.82

10

Indira Gandhi Ctr Atom Res

18

1.20

11

Natl Inst Radiol Sci

38

1.65

11

Zhejiang Univ

18

1.20

12

Delft Univ Technol

35

1.52

12

Univ Missouri

16

1.07

13

Ege Univ

31

1.34

13

Acad Sci Czech Republic

15

1.00

14

Japan Atom Energy Agcy

31

1.34

14

CNR

15

1.00

15

Univ Texas Austin

31

1.34

15

Ege Univ

15

1.00

16

Natl Inst Stand & Technol

28

1.21

16

Univ Sao Paulo

15

1.00

17

Nucl Res Inst

27

1.17

17

Univ W Bohemia

15

1.00

18

Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico

27

1.17

    

19

IPEN

26

1.13

    

20

Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab

25

1.08

    

21

Pakistan Inst Nucl Sci & Technol

25

1.08

    

22

IPEN CNEN SP

24

1.04

    

23

Saha Inst Nucl Phys

24

1.04

    

24

Univ Tokyo

24

1.04

    

It can be seen that the two lists are less overlapping than in the case of the countries. There are typically “producer” and typically “consumer” institutes. From an editorial point of view, it is particularly informative to find institutions (such as Florida State Univ and IAEA) extensively using JRNC papers as references, but less active in publication in the journal. Such institutions can be considered potential future contributors of the journal.

Analysis of authors

Table 3 contains the h-cores of source and target authors. The overlap here has been reduced to three authors; the editors may consider ways to motivate the other authors in the lists to a more “balanced” publication behavior.

Table 3

The h-core of source and target authors

Source authors

Target authors

Rank

Author

Count

%

Rank

Author

Count

%

1

Makrlik, E

52

2.25

1

Jalilian, AR

24

1.61

2

Vanura, P

51

2.21

2

Zhang, AY

16

1.07

3

Freitas, MC

31

1.34

3

Burnett, WC

15

1.00

4

Saiki, M

28

1.21

4

Vanura, P

15

1.00

5

Bacchi, MA

26

1.13

5

Makrlik, E

14

0.94

6

Landsberger, S

25

1.08

6

Uchida, S

14

0.94

7

Revay, Z

23

1.00

7

Chettle, DR

13

0.87

8

Spyrou, NM

23

1.00

8

Pejovic-Milic, A

13

0.87

9

Chai, ZF

21

0.91

9

Tagami, K

13

0.87

10

Lahiri, S

21

0.91

10

Srinivasan, TG

12

0.80

11

Selucky, P

21

0.91

11

Chai, ZF

11

0.74

12

Pacheco, AMG

19

0.82

12

Povinec, PP

11

0.74

13

Belgya, T

17

0.74

13

Rao, PRV

11

0.74

14

Tagliaferro, FS

16

0.69

14

Soylak, M

11

0.74

15

Bode, P

15

0.65

15

Venkatesan, KA

11

0.74

16

Chung, YS

15

0.65

    

17

Ebihara, M

15

0.65

    

18

Fernandes, EAD

15

0.65

    

19

Unak, P

15

0.65

    

20

Vasconcellos, MBA

15

0.65

    

Analysis of citing journals

The h-core of the 494 journals citing 2005–2009 JRNC papers is given in Table 4. The list contains no odd item, neither any expected title is missing. In a recent paper [11], a similarity measure named h-similarity for journals has been advised on the basis of common references and using Hirsch-type statistics. Reassuringly, the top three elements of the list in Table 4 are exactly the three journals with highest h-similarity to JRNC, and one more title in the list belongs to the most similar journals (they are highlighted in italics).

Table 4

The h-core of journals citing JRNC

Rank

Title

Count

%

1

Applied Radiation and Isotopes

92

6.16

2

Radiochimica Acta

56

3.75

3

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity

54

3.61

4

Journal of Hazardous Materials

41

2.74

5

Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry

39

2.61

6

Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors and Associated Equipment

38

2.54

7

Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms

36

2.41

8

Radiation Protection Dosimetry

22

1.47

9

Analytical Chemistry

21

1.41

10

Analytica Chimica Acta

20

1.34

11

Nukleonika

16

1.07

12

Talanta

15

1.00

13

Environmental Science & Technology

14

0.94

14

Science of the Total Environment

14

0.94

Analysis of citing subject areas

In the WoS database all journals are assigned to one or more subject areas. Using this assignment, a statistics has been made on the subject area classification of the citing papers. The h-core is shown in Table 5.

Table 5

The h-core of subject areas of the journals citing JRNC

Rank

Subject area

Count

%

1

Nuclear Science & Technology

342

22.89

2

Environmental Sciences

264

17.67

3

Chemistry, Inorganic & Nuclear

207

13.86

4

Chemistry, Analytical

172

11.51

5

Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging

166

11.11

6

Chemistry, Multidisciplinary

130

8.70

7

Spectroscopy

124

8.30

8

Chemistry, Physical

88

5.89

9

Physics, Nuclear

87

5.82

10

Instruments & Instrumentation

80

5.35

11

Physics, Atomic, Molecular & Chemical

78

5.22

12

Engineering, Chemical

70

4.69

13

Engineering, Environmental

70

4.69

14

Materials Science, Multidisciplinary

58

3.88

15

Physics, Particles & Fields

50

3.35

16

Geosciences, Multidisciplinary

46

3.08

17

Public, Environmental & Occupational Health

45

3.01

18

Engineering, Civil

44

2.95

19

Chemistry, Applied

39

2.61

20

Oceanography

34

2.28

21

Biochemical Research Methods

32

2.14

22

Geochemistry & Geophysics

32

2.14

23

Water Resources

31

2.08

24

Pharmacology & Pharmacy

30

2.01

25

Physics, Multidisciplinary

27

1.81

Obviously, physical and chemical areas are dominating the scene and, as already could be seen in the journal list of Table 4, JRNC information is utilized preeminently by environmental sciences (with related areas of earth and water sciences), as well. A negative lesson of the list is the striking lack of biological-biomedical sciences among the target fields—a lesson that should be seriously considered in the editorial policy of the journal.

Analysis of citations

The h-index of JRNC for the period under study was 13, i.e., there were 13 papers in the source dataset receiving at least 13 citations. These papers are listed in Table 6.

Table 6

The h-core of the most cited papers in the source dataset

Rank

Authors

Title

Bibliographic data

Times cited

1

Dulaiova, H; Peterson, R; Burnett, WC; et al.

A multi-detector continuous monitor for assessment of Rn-222 in the coastal ocean

263 (2005) 361–365

29

2

Giridhar, P; Venkatesan, KA; Srinivasan, TG; et al.

Extraction of uranium(VI) from nitric acid medium by 1.1 M tri-n-butylphosphate in ionic liquid diluent

265 (2005) 31–38

26

3

James, WD; Hirsch, LR; West, JL; et al.

Application of INAA to the build-up and clearance of gold nanoshells in clinical studies in mice

271 (2007) 455–459

25

4

Lee, SH; La Rosa, J; Gastaud, J; et al.

The development of sequential separation methods for the analysis of actinides in sediments and biological materials using anion-exchange resins and extraction chromatography

263 (2005) 419–425

22

5

Zhang, A; Wei, Y; Kumagai, M

Bleeding evaluation of the stationary phase from a few novel macroporous silica-substrate polymeric materials used for radionuclide partitioning from HLLW in MAREC process

265 (2005) 409–417

19

6

Pike, SM; Buesseler, KO; Andrews, J; et al.

Quantification of Th-234 recovery in small volume sea water samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

263 (2005) 355–360

17

7

Revay, Z; Belgya, T; Molnar, GL

Application of Hypermet-PC in PGAA

265 (2005) 261–265

15

8

Freitas, MC; Farinha, MM; Pacheco, AMG; et al.

Atmospheric selenium in an industrialized area of Portugal

263 (2005) 711-719

15

9

Kilincarslan, A; Akyil, S

Uranium adsorption characteristic and thermodynamic behavior of clinoptilolite zeolite

264 (2005) 541–548

14

10

Povinec, PP

Ultra-sensitive radionuclide spectrometry: Radiometrics and mass spectrometry synergy

263 (2005) 413–417

14

11

La Rosa, J; Gastaud, J; Lagan, L; et al.

Recent developments in the analysis of transuranics (Np, Pu, Am) in seawater

263 (2005) 427–436

14

12

Gmeling, K; Harangi, S; Kasztovszky, Z

Boron and chlorine concentration of volcanic rocks: An application of prompt gamma activation analysis

265 (2005) 201–212

13

13

Szelecsényi, F; Kovács, Z; Suzuki, K; et al.

Production possibility of Cu-61 using proton induced nuclear reactions on zinc for PET studies

263 (2005) 539–546

13

The target dataset received a total of 4,590 citations (3.07 citations per item). The h-index of the target dataset was 25, i.e., there were 25 items among the papers citing at least one JRNC paper from the period under study receiving at least 25 citations. Short descriptions of these papers are listed in Table 7. A more detailed description of these papers can be found in the bibliography in the Appendix; for reference, the item # is given in the last column.

Table 7

The h-core of the most cited papers in the target dataset

Rank

Short bibliographic description

Times cited

Item # in the Appendix

1

LEWINSKI-N, SMALL, 4 (2008) 26–49

164

#1400

2

QIAN-XM, NAT BIOTECHNOL, 26 (2008) 83–90

143

#1049

3

BLAIN-S, NATURE, 446 (2007) 1070–U1

92

#1051

4

BINNEMANS-K, CHEM REV, 107 (2007) 2592–2614

84

#326

5

LANZ-VA, ATMOS CHEM PHYS, 7 (2007) 1503–1522

72

#230

6

ARRUEBO-M, NANO TODAY, 2 (2007) 22–32

65

#1043

7

BURNETT-WC, SCI TOTAL ENVIR, 367 (2006) 498–543

62

#1367

8

CHAN-CK, ATMOS ENVIRON, 42 (2008) 1–42

61

#232

9

DUMONT-E, ANAL BIOANAL CHEM, 385 (2006) 1304–1323

53

#42

10

FISCHER-HC, CURR OPIN BIOTECHNOL, 18 (2007) 565–571

43

#384

11

DIETZ-ML, SEPAR SCI TECHNOL, 41 (2006) 2047–2063

43

#1387

12

BACON-JR, ANALYST, 133 (2008) 25–46

40

#98

13

HERMAN-M, NUCL DATA SHEETS, 108 (2007) 2655–2715

38

#1056

14

SOYLAK-M, J HAZARD MATER, 137 (2006) 1496–1501

38

#821

15

WANG-JH, ANAL CHEM, 79 (2007) 620–625

37

#56

16

VAN DER LOEFF-MR, MAR CHEM, 100 (2006) 190–212

37

#986

17

YANG-XM, NANO LETT, 7 (2007) 3798–3802

35

#1041

18

DURRANT-SF, J ANAL ATOM SPECTROM, 20 (2005) 821–829

35

#642

19

CAI-LS, EUR J ORG CHEM, (2008) 2853–2873

34

#473

20

LAL-S, ACCOUNT CHEM RES, 41 (2008) 1842–1851

33

#1

21

KOESTER-CJ, ANAL CHEM, 77 (2005) 3737–3754

33

#51

22

PIETRALLA-N, PROG PART NUCL PHYS, 60 (2008) 225–282

31

#1229

23

BUTLER-OT, J ANAL ATOM SPECTROM, 21 (2006) 217–243

30

#645

24

DU-Z, CHEM-EUR J, 13 (2007) 2130–2137

25

#329

25

TUZEN-M, ANAL CHIM ACTA, 581 (2007) 241–246

25

#75

The fact that the papers citing JRNC are apparently higher cited than JRNC papers themselves (whether measured by the average or the h-index) may be first thought to be an alarming sign, but it is not necessarily the case. It may also be regarded as the effect of the attention (manifested in the form of citations) to JRNC by papers in high-prestige, high-impact journals (see the Nature, Chem. Rev., etc. papers in Table 7). In a recent paper [12], it was shown that the h-index of a set of citing papers (to a single paper or a set of papers, e.g., a journal) characterizes the “indirect citation impact” of the source set, i.e., its influence exerted through the presence in reference lists. Researchers frequently get acquainted with publications by finding them cited in other papers, and it is no secret, either, that “second-hand” informations are often cited without even consulting the original source. The set of citing papers, the target dataset, is in this sense the clue to a wider impact beyond direct visibility.

This significance of target dataset motivated us to compile a comprehensive bibliography of all papers citing JRNC papers published in the period 2005–2009 as a natural extension of the source dataset, the JRNC papers themselves.